Judge Napolitano urges Republicans to release explosive, classified “FISA memo” on House floor: “Public is entitled to know”

Thursday, January 25, 2018 by

Though many of us suspected for months that there was corruption at the highest levels of the FBI and the Department of Justice involving the Obama-era spying on Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign followed by the undermining of his presidency with a bogus “Russian collusion” hoax, it was hard to imagine corruption of the kind we’re about to witness.

In recent days Republicans in Congress have hinted that an explosive four-page document being called the “FISA memo” provides verification that not only did the FBI and DoJ spy on Team Trump, they abused the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court by improperly obtaining a surveillance warrant likely based on that phony opposition research document known as the “Trump dossier.”

If true, this will become the biggest scandal in the history of American politics and, with some luck, will not simply result in people getting fired, but in people getting indicted (it would be great if Hillary Clinton were one of them, but I’m not holding my breath).

In any event, several Republican lawmakers are pushing mightily for the memo’s release to the public — something they’ve said cannot be done a) unless the document is declassified; or b) unless President Trump himself declassifies and releases it.

Why they’re pushing is understandable: This appears to be smoking gun evidence that the Obama regime did its best Soviet Union interpretation by politicizing the DoJ and unleashing the Deep State on the campaign of a man they arbitrarily decided could not and should not be president (imagine the rage on the Left if President George W. Bush had done the same thing, based on the same conclusion, to Obama).

Last weekend, GOP Reps. Bob Goodlatte of Virginia, Trey Gowdy of South Carolina, and Devin Nunes of California met to discuss a “never-before-used procedure” for releasing the memo. House Intelligence Committee members would vote to publicize the memo, after which Trump would have five days to object. If he did not, the memo would go public.

But former judge and current Fox News contributor Andrew Napolitano said lawmakers don’t have to wait for either of those things to happen. He said a congressman — any congressman — can take the House floor and read the four-page memo into the Congressional Record. And that’s perfectly legal.

“I am suggesting that one of those members of Congress, who you just ran on the screen, should take this to the floor of the House of Representatives and release it there because the constitution protects anything that is said there,” said Napolitano.

It’s been done before.

“Senator Feinstein did this with torture memos,” he said, alluding to the senior California Democrat — then chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee — taking to the floor of her chamber in December 2014 to release details about the CIA’s interrogation of suspected terrorists during the Bush administration following the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.

“These members of Congress should do with this because the rest of Congress and the American public is entitled to know,” Napolitano said. (Released: House Intel Committee votes to release Simpson testimony; ‘Info suggests docs catastrophically BAD for DEMS.’)

But is that measure even necessary?

As reported by The National Sentinel, the White House itself said Wednesday that the president doesn’t have to approve the bombshell memo’s release.

“We don’t have to approve it. They have the right to declassify the document,” Gidley told Daily Caller editorial director Vince Coglianese and WMAL host, citing “legal minds” consulted by the executive branch.

Again, the president can object to the release of the memo if and only if lawmakers attempt to release it in a manner that is prescribed in procedure but as yet untried. So it appears as though the better idea is to just go to the House floor and read it.

If the memo contains verification that the Trump campaign was spied on illegally, there is no way the president would object to that.

Then again, there’s another way the president can help spread the word about the memo’s contents to a much wider audience: He can read it during his upcoming State of the Union address.

However the memo is released, it needs to get out.

J.D. Heyes is a senior writer for NaturalNews.com and NewsTarget.com, as well as editor of The National Sentinel.

Sources include:

TheNationalSentinel.com

WashingtonExaminer.com

TheGatewayPundit.com



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